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DNV GL provides technology qualification services for aerodyn’s new floating offshore wind design

Innovative concept allows for a rated power of 15 MW

DNV GL, the world’s largest resource of independent energy experts and certification body, has awarded aerodyn engineering with a statement of feasibility for its double rotor floating wind turbine concept nezzy². This statement, based on DNV GL’s technology qualification services, confirms that the floater is designed to state-of-the-art safety, quality and performance standards. It allows aerodyn to secure investments and enter the next level of prototype development.

“Floating offshore wind will be an exciting new market with 250 GW installed, producing 2% of global power in 2050, says Kim Mørk, Executive Vice President Renewables Certification at DNV GL. “Qualification of new technology based on state-of-the-art methods and certification schemes linked to international standards is key in bringing early confidence in the concept to this emerging industry.  “

“Through the cooperation with DNV GL, we have evaluated the technical and commercial risks of the project within the framework of the Technology Qualification. Now we are able to offer our customers a reliable, forward-looking and economically attractive solution confirmed by a statement of feasibility.” says Mr. Jan-Christoph Hinrichs, Project Manager nezzy² at aerodyn engineering.

The innovative floater is designed as self-aligning concrete structure attached by single point mooring system to the sea ground. The two turbines are mounted on a lift and drag optimized, lens shaped, guyed tower structure and will generate a total rated power of 15 MW.

About DNV GL floating wind standards and guidelines
Leading on standard development for offshore and floating wind, DNV GL has taken an important position on developing requirements for floating wind turbine structures. Inspired by the first full-scale turbine, Hywind Demo, DNV GL issued its first guideline in 2009. Building on experience from prototypes and research projects and learnings from the world’s first floating wind farm, Hywind Scotland, a new update was initiated and formed the DNV GL-ST-0119 standard issued in 2018. Some of the key updates included optimized safety factors in fatigue, specific load cases related to loss of mooring lines and aspects related to shared anchoring, and the motion control system. A further update of the standards is planned for early 2021.